Employee wellbeing is worth it: 4 good reasons for employers to invest

This post was originally written for the LifeDojo wellbeing blog. I’ve reproduced it below. You can see the original post here.

It’s a disturbing trend: Americans seem to be getting less healthy with every passing year. According to the Economist, health premiums in America have more than doubled in the past decade. The proportion of adults who are clinically obese more than doubled between 1980 and 2010, to over 30%. This year, healthcare spending hit historically high levels as a share of GDP, and according to government projections, annual health spending is expected to grow an average of 5.8% during the period of 2014 through 2024.

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Review: Spark

Spark is an incredibly important, exhaustively researched book that will fascinate anyone who is even remotely interested in how our brains work.

Now quite famous and highly regarded, psychiatrist John Ratey presents study after study in service to his thesis: that vigorous physical exercise is not only good for our bodies, it also has the power to improve mood, treat mental illnesses like anxiety and depression, prevent memory loss, improve conditions like ADD, and generally “remodel” our brains for all around better performance.

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Review: What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

This slim volume is partly a guide to training for long distance running, part memoir of a writer’s life and career, part zen philosophy of life and death. I’ve heard it repeatedly described as “intimate” and “thoughtful” and it is both of these things, yet also it is more.

For someone who hates to run, I sure have read a lot about long distance running lately. I read Scott Jurek’s ultramarathon running memoir/vegan cookbook, I’ve read more articles about the sport than I can count – partially because I’m trying to understand my husband (who loves running) but partially because I’m trying to understand other things, about life, discipline and repetition as the path to greatness in any of life’s pursuits, athletic or not.

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How to choose a stress management program: 5 questions to ask

This post was originally written for the LifeDojo wellbeing blog. I’ve reproduced it below. You can see the original post here.

Is stress really an “epidemic”?

Sadly, yes, according to the United Nations International Labor Organization, which recently declared that occupational stress has reached “epidemic” levels with costs estimated at upwards of $200 billion per year. If your business is affected by this “epidemic” like most others out there, then the majority of your employees are suffering from high levels of stress. Not only is this stress probably making them less happy than they could be, it’s costing your company money.  Lots of it.

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4 business lessons from Eastern philosophy

This post was originally written for the LifeDojo wellbeing blog. I’ve reproduced it below. You can see the original post here.

Once in a while, someone will ask us about the name of our company, LifeDojo, and they’ll want to know: What’s a Dojo, anyway?

“Dojo” is a Japanese term that literally means, “The place of the way.” Typically, it refers to a place or room where Japanese martial arts are practiced – a place of intense focus, mindfulness and learning. In one branch of Eastern Philosophy, the term describes the rooms or halls where monks engage in meditation.

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New employee stress management programs bring renewed hope

This post was originally written for the LifeDojo wellbeing blog. I’ve reproduced it below. You can see the original post here.

Stress-related health issues at work are too serious—too deadly—to ignore. When we look at the diseases most likely to harm or even kill us (like cancer, heart disease, or diabetes) we find that they are overwhelmingly made worse or even caused by high levels of stress. With the growing body of research showing the harmful effects of stress, HR leaders have been trying many approaches to help their workers.

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